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PHIL 310 - Environmental Philosophy
Fall 2017, Section 01

ID #Subj#SecTitleDatesDaysTimeCrdsStatusInstructorDelivery MethodLoc
000486 PHIL 310 01 Environmental Philosophy
08/22 - 11/28
T
6:00pm - 9:20pm
4.0 Open Hammer, Carl
Location: z MnSCU Metropolitan State University
Building/Room: Midway Center 154


Meeting Details
DatesDaysTimeBuilding/RoomInstructor
8/22/2017 - 11/28/2017 T 6:00pm - 9:20pm Midway Center 154 Hammer, Carl

Location Details
Offered through: Metropolitan State University.
Campus: Metropolitan State University. Location: z MnSCU Metropolitan State University.

Seat Availability
Status: Open Size: 32 Enrolled: 28 Seats Remaining: 4

Restrictions
  • Requires minimum credits: 30

Add/Drop/Withdraw
Full refund is available until August 27, 2017, 11:59PM CST.
Adding course is closed. Dropping course is closed.
The last day to withdraw from this course is November 20, 2017.

Tuition and Fees (Approximate)

Tuition and Fees (approximate):

Tuition -resident: $910.12
Tuition -nonresident: $1,856.92
Approximate Course Fees: $137.88

Course Level
Undergraduate

General/Liberal Education Category
Upper Division Liberal Studies

Minnesota Transfer Curriculum Goal
  • Goal 06 - Humanities/Fine Arts
    • Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities.
    • Understand those works as expressions of individual and human values within an historical and social context.
    • Respond critically to works in the arts and humanities.
    • Engage in the creative process or interpretive performance.
    • Articulate an informed personal reaction to works in the arts and humanities.
  • Goal 10 - People/Environment
    • Explain the basic structure and function of various natural ecosystems and of human adaptive strategies within those systems.
    • Discern patterns and interrelationships of bio-physical and socio-cultural systems.
    • Describe the basic institutional arrangements (social, legal, political, economic, religious) that are evolving to deal with environmental and natural resource challenges.
    • Evaluate critically environmental and natural resource issues in light of understandings about interrelationships, ecosystems, and institutions.
    • Propose and assess alternative solutions to environmental problems.
    • Articulate and defend the actions they would take on various environmental issues.

Description
In this course we use various philosophical approaches to explore the relations among persons, non-human animals and the worlds they inhabit separately and together. We will look closely at the grounds for claiming that we have obligations and duties in relation to non-human animals and the environment, as well as the ways in which these relations provide inspiration, companionship, solace and love. Topics may include: environmental justice and the disposal of electronic waste; animals and factory farming; the real cost of cheap consumer goods; the historical evolution of the concept of environment protection, of a land ethic, and of the development of natural parks; human stewardship; the possibility that natural creatures have a value that is independent of human benefit and whether it makes sense to grant them legal standing; global climate change; the connections between feminism and environmental ethics; the population time bomb and current responses; green politics; the role of scientific expertise in a democratic society; shallow vs deep environmental movements.

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