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HIST 333 - The Greening of America: Environmental History since 1900
Fall 2017, Section 01

ID #Subj#SecTitleDatesDaysTimeCrdsStatusInstructorDelivery MethodLoc
000506 HIST 333 01 The Greening of America: Environmental History since 1900
08/23 - 12/06
W
6:00pm - 9:20pm
4.0 Open Sayer, John
Location: z MnSCU Metropolitan State University
Building/Room: Midway Center 18


Meeting Details
DatesDaysTimeBuilding/RoomInstructor
8/23/2017 - 12/6/2017 W 6:00pm - 9:20pm Midway Center 18 Sayer, John

Location Details
Offered through: Metropolitan State University.
Campus: Metropolitan State University. Location: z MnSCU Metropolitan State University.

Seat Availability
Status: Open Size: 32 Enrolled: 26 Seats Remaining: 6

Prerequisites (Courses and Tests)
[WRIT 131 - Writing I]
Restrictions
  • Requires minimum credits: 30

Add/Drop/Withdraw
Full refund is available until August 27, 2017, 11:59PM CST.
Adding course is closed. Dropping course is closed.
The last day to withdraw from this course is November 20, 2017.

Tuition and Fees (Approximate)

Tuition and Fees (approximate):

Tuition -resident: $910.12
Tuition -nonresident: $1,856.92
Approximate Course Fees: $137.88

Course Level
Undergraduate

General/Liberal Education Category
Upper Division Liberal Studies

Minnesota Transfer Curriculum Goal
  • Goal 05 - Hist/Soc/Behav Sci
    • Employ the methods and data that historians and social and behavioral scientists use to investigate the human condition.
    • Examine social institutions and processes across a range of historical periods and cultures.
    • Develop and communicate alternative explanations or solutions for contemporary social issues.
  • Goal 10 - People/Environment
    • Explain the basic structure and function of various natural ecosystems and of human adaptive strategies within those systems.
    • Discern patterns and interrelationships of bio-physical and socio-cultural systems.
    • Describe the basic institutional arrangements (social, legal, political, economic, religious) that are evolving to deal with environmental and natural resource challenges.
    • Evaluate critically environmental and natural resource issues in light of understandings about interrelationships, ecosystems, and institutions.
    • Propose and assess alternative solutions to environmental problems.
    • Articulate and defend the actions they would take on various environmental issues.

Description
This course surveys the history of environmentalism in America over the last 100 years. Students are introduced to the ideas of the environmentalists-from Theodore Roosevelt and Rachel Carson to EarthFirst!'s Dave Foreman and Vice President Al Gore-about wilderness preservation, resource conservation, public health and, fundamentally, about the proper relationship between humans and the natural world. Environmentalist thought and actions are considered in the context of ecological and resource crises (such as the Dust Bowl of the 1930s and the oil crisis of the 1970s), of problems created by technological applications (such as the widespread use of DDT) and of particular cultural developments (such as the closing of the "frontier" at the turn of the century and the growth of the counterculture in the 1960s).

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